Author Archives: Benny Bellagio

Binge-Watching Is Now One of America's Favorite Pastimes, According to New Survey

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More than two-thirds of Americans who subscribe to streaming video services watch episodes back-to-back-to-back-to-back-to-back, a new survey shows.

Of the 46% of Americans who subscribe to streaming services, 70% of them binge-watch TV shows, according to the latest “Digital Democracy Survey” conducted by consulting firm Deloitte. Viewers average five episodes per spree.

The survey, which polled 2,205 people last November, found that 31% of respondents binge-watch on a weekly basis, a number that increases to 36% in the 19-25 demographic. Drama is the most popular genre to binge, at 53%, followed by comedy at 17% and reality at 7%.

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The survey also shed light on how millennials consume content. Unsurprisingly, millennials spend more time streaming than watching live TV

Millennials “value streaming more than [live] TV, and when they do watch TV they are doing an average of four other things at a time,” Kevin Westcott, Deloitte’s U.S. media and entertainment consulting principal, told Variety, which first reported the results. More than 90 percent of US consumers are now multitasking while watching TV, according to the survey.

The survey found, essentially, that Americans — and young Americans especially — are becoming more addicted to streaming every year, both in terms of how much time they spend binge-watching and how much they value their Netflix accounts.

See the full results of the survey here. Do you binge-watch?

Watch the First Trailer for Bridget Jones's Baby

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Everything has changed, and yet everything is exactly the same in the first trailer for Bridget Jones’s Baby.

Bridget (Renee Zellwegger) is still having awkwardly terse encounters with (her now ex), Mark Darcy (Colin Firth), still struggling to define her place at work, and once again caught in a love triangle with a tall, dark and handsome man (Patrick Dempsey), who will probably turn out to be a cad because we all know Mark and Bridget are MFEO.

But there is one big difference in the third movie: Bridget’s pregnant!

As to who the father is, we’ll all have to wait until Bridget Jones’s Baby hits theaters on Sept. 16 to find out. In the meantime, check out the full trailer, which exclusively premiered on Ellen, below.

To live longer, eat like the Japanese

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Go ahead and indulge your sushi habit: A new study finds a Japanese diet of fish, rice, seaweed, and sake could add years to your life. Not only does following Japan’s dietary guidelines result in a 15 percent lower total mortality rate, but it also lowers one’s risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to the study in the British Medical Journal.

The diet encompasses “grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, eggs, soy products, dairy products, confectionaries, and alcoholic beverages,” researchers say in a release, though the “Spinning Top” food guide the country introduced in 2005 colorfully specifies the latter two should be enjoyed “moderately!” Researchers surveyed 79,544 people aged 45 to 75 in Japan—where the average life expectancy is 87 for women and 80 for men—about their health and food habits when the study began, then again five and 10 years later.

They then compared eating habits to Japan’s dietary guidelines and gave each participant a score based on how closely his or her diet synced with them.

Those who received high scores—meaning they generally adhered to the guidelines—were more likely to be women, drink green tea, and eat more calories, reports Time.

They were also 15 percent less likely to die from all causes and 22% less likely to die from stroke, per Live Science. Though researchers say a diet low in fat and high in fish and soybean products is beneficial, the participants who ate a lot of fruit and veggies, supplemented by fish and meats, profited the most.

(Spicy food might also help you live longer.)

This article originally appeared on Newser: To Live Longer, Eat Like the Japanese

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The unusual way a man inherited his sister's kiwi allergy

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When a leukemia patient received a bone marrow transplant from his sister, all went smoothly—until he bit into a kiwi fruit and his lips began to tingle and swell.

Turns out the patient was suffering from the “oral allergic symptom” his sister had long endured, and now that her bone marrow cells were in his body, he is to share in that suffering possibly for the rest of his life, reports ScienceAlert.

This kind of allergy transfer has been observed in bone marrow transplant patients before, but researchers reporting in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology say this is the first time that such an allergy transfer has actually been proven, a finding that could help scientists better understand how allergies start in the first place and thus how to treat them.

An allergic reaction is typically the body’s immune system mistaking something that is harmless, such as an otherwise safe type of food or dust, for something it needs to fight.

The blood cells themselves are behind this reaction, and because most blood cells form in our bone marrow, this type of transplant may actually result in a semi-permanent or permanent allergy transfer.

And while it’s extremely rare, other procedures have been shown to at least temporarily transfer allergies between patients, as was the 2015 case in which an 8-year-old Canadian boy developed a severe allergy to fish and peanuts following a blood transfusion, reports RedOrbit.

In the kiwi case, scientists used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to prove that the cells causing the man’s allergy had indeed come from his sister.

(Women seem to suffer from more severe allergic reactions.)

This article originally appeared on Newser: Man Inherits Sister’s Kiwi Allergy in Most Unusual Way

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TRS Pits Their Top 100 Movies Against Each Other In Some Tough Battles

The guys make some tough decisions in this edition of TRS Vs.